A dog has the characters of eight sorts of people:-

‘He has the character of a priest,
‘He has the character of a warrior,
‘He has the character of a husbandman,
‘He has the character of a strolling singer,
‘He has the character of a thief,
‘He has the character of a disu (wild beast),
‘He has the character of a courtezan,
‘He has the character of a child.

 

‘He eats the refuse, like a priest; he is easily satisfied,like a priest; he is patient, like a priest; he wants only a small piece of bread, like a priest; in these things he is like unto a priest.

‘He marches in front, like a warrior; he fights for the beneficent cow, like a warrior;he goes first out of the house, like a warrior; in these things he is like unto a warrior.

‘He is watchful and sleeps lightly, like a husbandman; he goes first out of the house, like a husbandman;he returns last into the house, like a husbandman;in these things he is like unto a husbandman.

‘He is fond of singing, like a strolling singer ;he wounds him who gets too near, like a strolling singer; he is ill-trained, like a strolling singer; he is changeful, like a strolling singer; in these things he is like
unto a strolling singer.

‘He is fond of darkness, like a thief; he prowls about in darkness, like a thief; he is a shameless eater, like a thief; he is therefore an unfaithful keeper, like a thief; in these things he is like unto a thief

‘He is fond of darkness, like a disu (wild beast); he prowls about in darkness,like a disu; he is a shameless eater, like a disu (wild beast); he is therefore anunfaithful keeper, like a disu (wild beast); in these things he is like unto a disu (wild beast).

‘He is fond of singing, like a courtezan; he wounds him who gets too near, like a courtezan; he roams along the roads, like a courtezan; he is ill-trained, like a courtezan; he is changeful, like a courtezan;in these things he is like unto a courtezan.

‘He is fond of sleep, like a child; he is tender like snow, like a child; he is full of tongue, like a child; he digs the earth with his paws,like a child; in these things he is like unto a child.

_____

Avesta:Vendidad, Fargard Chapter 13 verses 44-48

____

Vendidad (Vidēvdād) or Laws against the Demons
Avesta
The Sacred Books of Zoroastrianism, Book 3.
Translated by James Darmesteter (From
Sacred Books of the East,American Edition, 1898.)
Edited by Joseph H. Peterson
sktagg23:

Reblogging this in honor of Robin Williams. Please, if you are battling depression or suicidal thoughts, I desperately urge you to talk to someone. I will listen, and so will the people at this number.

sktagg23:

Reblogging this in honor of Robin Williams. Please, if you are battling depression or suicidal thoughts, I desperately urge you to talk to someone. I will listen, and so will the people at this number.

(Source: weheartit.com)

(Reblogged from becauseiamawoman)
I have been looking for the words that come before words, the ones older than silence, the ones not mine, that can’t be found by thought—the ones that hold the beginning of the world and are never used up, which arrive loaned, and make me weep.
[8] Shaffer, Nancy, “In Stillness,” Instructions in Joy (Boston: Skinner House, 2002) p. 5.

(Source: uuse.org)

You want to know my name? —a hill, a tree. An empty drifting boat.

Hsu Hsuan

(via thecalminside)

(Reblogged from hoodoo-seed)

It hums through the trees.
Its song made of many notes,
Made of many things.

A hot sizzle sound
Cicadas buzz harmony.
Wrens call liquidly—

And doves mournfully.
Crows caw in chorus.
The dogs bark at everything—

Panting, grinning, lolling tongues.
The mocking birds mock
The flycatchers catch.

Wind slices through spread wings
cutting between the vanes,
like air though a woodwind reed.

Boys, girls howl and laugh,
screech and run through the long grasses,
Blackberry stains abound.

Evening gowns the trees gold.
The song shakes their branches.
A whispering tambourine.

The crickets join in,
Then the whippoorwills,
And the frogs with their drum drums.

The fire flies dancing,
The song swirls under the moon,
A baby giggles sleeping.

Be gentle with yourself. You are a child of the universe, no less than the trees and the stars; you have a right to be here.
 Max Ehrmann, Desiderata: A Poem for a Way of Life (via inatt)

(Source: rosyrocks)

(Reblogged from cariboumythos)
Whosoever is delighted in solitude is either a wild beast or a god.

Aristotle (via delicatesenpai)

goddess status.

(via str8nochaser)

This is a GREAT quote. I am equal parts Beast/Goddess FOR SURE.

(via bonitappleblog)

(Reblogged from hoodoo-seed)

When an archer is shooting for nothing,
He has all his skill.
If he shoots for a brass buckle,
He is already nervous.
If he shoots for a prize of gold,
He goes blind,
Or sees two targets—
He is out of his mind!

His skill has not changed. But the prize,
Divides him. He cares.
He thinks more of winning,
Than of shooting—
And the need to win,
Drains his power.

Thomas Merton, The Way of Chuang Tzu